plants grow – Rogers Garden Gate http://www.rogersgardengate.com/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 04:25:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.rogersgardengate.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png plants grow – Rogers Garden Gate http://www.rogersgardengate.com/ 32 32 Tom Karwin, on gardening | Spring Flowering Plants of Chile – Monterey Herald https://www.rogersgardengate.com/tom-karwin-on-gardening-spring-flowering-plants-of-chile-monterey-herald/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 23:50:43 +0000 https://www.rogersgardengate.com/tom-karwin-on-gardening-spring-flowering-plants-of-chile-monterey-herald/ Take care of your garden Recent chronicles have provided brief glimpses of plants native to many of the world’s dry summer (Mediterranean) climates. These climatic regions include California, so all summer dry plants are compatible with the Monterey Bay region. Today’s column focuses on the plants of Chile. Chile’s borders are reflected in its long, […]]]>

Take care of your garden

Recent chronicles have provided brief glimpses of plants native to many of the world’s dry summer (Mediterranean) climates. These climatic regions include California, so all summer dry plants are compatible with the Monterey Bay region. Today’s column focuses on the plants of Chile.

Chile’s borders are reflected in its long, thin shape: 61 miles wide and 4,000 miles long. By comparison, California is 250 miles wide and 770 miles long. Chile has the very long Andes mountain range to the east and the Pacific Ocean to the west.

The flora of Chile includes fewer species than in other regions of South America, but there are many attractive varieties and a high percentage of plants native (endemic) to this county. Several plants that grow across the Andes in Peru also grow in Chile.

Chile’s geographic length means that its plant life spans different growing conditions. These can be divided into three roughly equal areas: the northern deserts, central Chile, and the humid southern regions.

While plants in all three zones thrive in a dry summer climate, plants in the 1,250-mile-long central region are most compatible with gardens along the California coast. The deserts of California have plants like those in the desert region of northern Chile, but California does not have the humidity of the southern region of Chile.

This unusual soil may look very exotic from a gardening perspective, but many of its native plants are familiar to California gardens. Examples include the following:

Mountain angel’s trumpet (Brugmansia sanguinea). This 8 to 10 foot tall shrub typically has trumpet-shaped orange-red flowers with yellow veins or orange blooms; other varieties have orange, yellow or even pink flowers.

Rock purslane (Cistanthe grandiflora. This succulent (formerly called Calandrina) grows 1 foot tall and 3 feet wide and from spring to fall produces brilliant purple flowers on stems 2 to 3 feet tall.

Peruvian lily (Alstromeria). Despite its common name, many species of this plant are native to Chile or other parts of South America and naturalized in many parts of the world. Many cultivars of this plant can be found in home gardens. An evergreen variety, A. aurantiaca, grows about 3 feet tall and produces numerous yellow, orange, or orange-red flowers. This plant spreads vigorously through fleshy roots and can become invasive. By the way, he really isn’t a member of the Lily family.

Rain Lily (Zephyranthes candida). This plant produces grass-like leaves and, in response to occasional rains, produces 1-2 inch white flowers on 6-10 inch stems from late summer to early fall. . A lovely little plant that should be watered during our increasingly dry periods of summer. Also, not a member of the Lily family.

Wonder of Peru/Four O’clock (Mirabilis jalapa). The generic name means “wonderful”, referring to its extraordinary production of flowers of different colors and patterns on the same plant. The common name indicates the flowering time of each day, although my plants often flower later in the day, continue through the night, and fade in the morning. This plant creates many seeds that grow easily and develop substantial tuberous roots.

Chile’s native plants include many other attractive plants that are less common in Caliornia gardens. Here are some selected examples from my garden.

Chilean jasmine (Mandevilla laxa). An evergreen vine, this plant grows 15 to 20 feet tall on a custom-made copper trellis and produces fragrant 2-inch-wide flowers during the summer. I had to cut this vine to the ground in preparation for painting the house, and it had grown back wonderfully. My aspiration is to accompany it with a Chilean bellflower (Lapageria rosea), the national flower of this country, and another high-growing vine with red trumpet-shaped flowers.

Sacred Flower of the Andes (Cantua buxifolia ‘Hot Pants’). This erect shrub grows six feet tall and produces a profusion of orange to magenta pink flowers. This plant thrives in full sun and is a magnet for hummingbirds. It has a messy, sprawling shape, so it’s best managed by planting several branches together and cutting off the longest stems. This should be done after flowering, as it blooms on old wood.

Hardy Fuchsia (F. magellanica ‘Aurea’). This plant native to Chile and Argentina, notable for its resistance to Fuchsia Gall (Aculops fuchsiae) mites, has been widely hybridized to provide attractive cultivars for the garden. It should be pruned severely in early spring after new growth has appeared, then tapered to encourage the bush.

Advance your knowledge

An online source of information about these plants Chileflora (www.chileflora.com/), which includes articles, a gallery of Chilean landscapes and a database of plants native to the country. The Chileflora website also offers seeds for many Chilean plants that could be welcome additions to your garden.

Upcoming garden webinars:

The Cactus & Succulent Society of America will present the webinar, “Euphorbia II: Spiny Shrubs and Mound Formers,” at 10 a.m. Saturday. Presenter Bob Webb will describe several species of Euphorbias, native to Yemen, East Africa, South Africa and Namibia. If you already have euphorbias in your garden, this webinar will provide you with useful information on the horticulture and propagation of these plants. To register for this free event, go to cactusandsuculentsociety.org/.

The Ruth Bancroft Garen & Nursery will present the “Dry Garden Botany 101” webinar, at 10 a.m. on March 19. “With a focus on dry garden plants, this course will give you the basics to understand how plants are scientifically classified into different families and an overview of plant parts. This is a paid event. To register, go to ruthbancroftgarden.org and scroll through “Featured Events” (where later events are also listed).

Enrich your gardening days

Chilean plants could be interesting to explore when you are developing your garden for spring blooms. You can find these plants by searching the internet for their botanical names. While many of these plants are included on mail order nursery websites, some sites include listings by country of origin.

***

Tom Karwin is past president of the Friends of the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum, the Monterey Bay Area Cactus & Succulent Society, and the Monterey Bay Iris Society, and UC Lifetime Master Gardener (certified 1999-2009 ). He is now a board member and garden coach for the Santa Cruz Hostel Society. To see daily photos of her garden, https://www.facebook.com/ongardingcom-566511763375123/. For information on gardening coaching and an archive of previous On Gardening columns, visit http://ongarding.com. Contact him with comments or questions at tom@karwin.com.

]]>
Alan Titchmarsh: The best gardening books from my 5,000 volume library https://www.rogersgardengate.com/alan-titchmarsh-the-best-gardening-books-from-my-5000-volume-library/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 12:30:29 +0000 https://www.rogersgardengate.com/alan-titchmarsh-the-best-gardening-books-from-my-5000-volume-library/ Alan Titchmarsh’s best gardening books have helped shape his career – he takes a look at some very special items from his library. When my children were small, I told myself that the library I was building, in addition to being for my pleasure, would provide them with everything they wanted to know: “Dad; how […]]]>

Alan Titchmarsh’s best gardening books have helped shape his career – he takes a look at some very special items from his library.

When my children were small, I told myself that the library I was building, in addition to being for my pleasure, would provide them with everything they wanted to know: “Dad; how do plants grow? Who built the Taj Mahal? Where is Azerbaijan?’ And then, when they were 11 and 13, the Internet arrived. Once again, my study was mine alone.

When it comes to finding information about plants, gardens and all things green – as with any topic you want to mention – the internet is an instant source. And yet, and yet… in terms of tactility — and illustrations — electronic communication is left for dead by the printed page. Not only do books furnish a room, they also furnish a mind and, just as importantly, they stimulate the senses.

I admit to using the Internet for scraps of information, but as a book collector for 50 years, my bookshelves bear witness to my delight in the content that lies between the covers of over 5,000 volumes on everything from art and architecture to natural history. , botany and gardening.

I wholeheartedly subscribe to Sir Winston Churchill’s saying, “If you can’t read all your books… stroke them… look at them, let them open where they want, read from the first sentence that holds the ‘eye, put them back on the shelves with your own hands, arrange them according to your own plan so that you at least know where they are. Let them be your friends; let them, in any case, be your acquaintances.

“Kim Wilkie’s Led by the Land and Tom Stuart-Smith’s Drawn From the Land provide insight into the spirit and manifestations of two of our greatest landscape gardeners”

Old volumes like that of Gérard Herball and Redoute Roses sit side by side with 19th century leather bound volumes Curtis Botanical Magazinewhose hand-colored plates amaze anyone who picks up a volume and flips through the pages.

But my interest and my pleasure have no limit at the dawn of the 21st century. There are brand new volumes that make me happy and these tend to fall into two camps: those that are beautifully produced and well illustrated and those that are discursive and thought provoking. Some books have managed to fulfill both requirements at the same time. Among these, that of Kim Wilkie ruled by earth and Tom Stuart-Smith Pulled from the ground provide insight into the spirit and manifestations of two of our greatest landscape artists. I use the term “gardener” rather than “architect”, because both have a great sense of plants, in addition to being sculptors of the earth.

At Arabella Lennox-Boyd’s The gardens of my life operates on a slightly smaller scale, but all three books are inspiring and rewarding and I find myself opening them and poring over their glorious pages on a fairly regular basis, not just with envy, but with the aim of emulating their talent.

When it comes to inspirational writing, two contemporary exponents come to mind: Robin Lane Fox and Hugh Johnson. Better gardening was published by Mr. Lane Fox in 1982, but the writing has a freshness that the years have not tarnished. Thoughtful gardening from 2010 builds on these earlier experiences, as we all should.

“Wise, prejudiced, opinionated and anti-mildew, Christopher Lloyd fired up a generation or two of gardeners”

by Hugh Johnson Sitting in the shade is a brand new 10 year compilation of the author’s diary. Having written about gardens and gardening since 1975 under the title ‘Trad’ at the top of the RHS journal The gardenthe current compilation shows that Mr Johnson’s palate, far from being jaded, has matured as one of the great wines of which he is also an expert.

These two writers both have an engaging yet informative style and their books are perfect for the bedside table – a section or two each night before eyelids start to droop is the perfect nightcap.

I cannot leave out Christopher Lloyd, whose friendship I valued immensely and with whom I sat by a crackling log fire at Great Dixter and chewed the fat. As long-time readers of country life will know, he wrote his weekly column in this magazine for 42 years, starting in 1963. Wise, prejudiced, opinionated and a mold breaker, he ignited a generation or two of gardeners with his well-crafted prose, steeped in experience and spirit. When it comes to garden writing, he has never been eclipsed, and when I want to renew our friendship, I have only to pick up one of his books.

Friendship, wisdom and glorious images – on the page or in the mind – available now in a book near you.


Alan Titchmarsh’s Christmas column takes a look at all the plants for the holiday season.

Alan Titchmarsh’s greenhouse has gotten a little predictable, but now he has big plans to mix things up.

As the weather opens up for us all to spend more time in the garden, Alan Titchmarsh offers his advice

Alan Titchmarsh admits that it’s not just the toughest gardening tasks, but also the mundane tasks that “give me

Alan Titchmars on planting tulips – and avoids the drudgery of removing and storing bulbs each year.

]]>
Indoor lights open up possibilities for winter gardening https://www.rogersgardengate.com/indoor-lights-open-up-possibilities-for-winter-gardening/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 14:30:00 +0000 https://www.rogersgardengate.com/indoor-lights-open-up-possibilities-for-winter-gardening/ You can grow any herbs you like in the winter – if you have lights. (Getty Pictures) Even the casual reader knows that I insist that everyone have a lighting system to maintain plants during the winter months. Maintenance is, of course, just one of the benefits of having a string light. Not having to […]]]>

Even the casual reader knows that I insist that everyone have a lighting system to maintain plants during the winter months. Maintenance is, of course, just one of the benefits of having a string light. Not having to wait until April, when there is enough natural light to start seeds, is another. You can start seeds at the same time as local nurseries.

Far too often, however, I even overlook a third benefit of having a set of plant lights, and that might just be the best thing about owning lights. Simply put, we can grow whatever we want during the winter months. Whatever.

I was thinking about this the other day when someone mentioned that they only use Stevia to sweeten things up. I’ve always wondered how this plant would do outdoors here, and I know that in some places it overwinters indoors. Why don’t Alaskans grow it? Perhaps because stevia plants need at least 15 hours of light per day to produce enough leaves to make growing them worthwhile. With lights, all you need is some organic potting soil and some space, as these plants can grow up to 3 feet.

All major seed houses sell stevia. There are several varieties, but Stevia rebaudiana is recommended. As a bonus, you can grow your plant outdoors this summer and bring it back under lights to continue harvesting through the winter. Stevia plants last up to five years. Now that’s nice!

It made me think of the so-called “miracle berry”, Synsepalum dulcificum. It is the plant that produces a berry which, when eaten, gives acidic foods a sweet taste. Eat a lime! Here is a plant that you could keep under lights all year round. I grew some once from seed, but didn’t realize it took three years to get fruit and I didn’t have a place where the temperatures would stay warm. I didn’t have the best lighting system either. Time to try again? To verify this fascinating berry on the Internet. You might want to order a few berries first and then consider growing a plant or two.

No need to stick to exotics when growing under lights. Really, a set of lights lets you grow anything. What about potatoes, for example? Again, you need a bit of space, but the idea of ​​growing potatoes in the dead of winter may have escaped your imagination. You can use supermarket potatoes if they sprout – not all of them will. Next year save some of your summer harvest to use.

You can grow your potatoes in one of those 5 gallon plastic buckets after drilling drainage holes. Place a few inches of mulch or well-drained potting soil at the bottom. Plant your chips – pieces of potato, each with at least one eye. Place the buckets under lights and, as you would outside, add soil or mulch as the plants grow so that only a few inches of spikes show. Once they start to flower, place the buckets in a cool place to move the sugars from the leaves to the tubers.

And, of course, you can grow tomatoes in the middle of winter. How can you beat that? You can not. Try several different types. You can grow indeterminate tomatoes as perennials under lights. Who needs an outdoor greenhouse?

Really, you can grow any herb you like if you have lights. We like to do a bit of Japanese cooking, so perilla – shiso – is an ideal herb for us. It’s so easy, but you can’t do it in the winter unless you have lights. The same goes for all the traditional herbs like dill, mint, chives, oregano and fennel. All it takes is a lighting system.

Try it. Who knows what will happen to using your winter lights to grow new things instead of just tending to your houseplants. It could become another side of your hobby. Instead of just growing for the winter, for example, you can end up growing things under these lights year-round, things like licorice, which takes three to five years, or that miracle berry plant. Now you can even grow cannabis. Try feminized auto-flowering strains.

My Point: With a grow light set, you can grow anything. They aren’t just for maintaining your houseplants or starting summer plants from seed. What do you want to grow? Just use your web browser to see if you can grow it indoors and look for instructions. If you are a regular reader of this column, you should already have the lights.

Jeff’s Alaskan Garden Calendar

Alaska Botanical Garden: Ice Sculptures! Exhibited during daytime opening hours, Wednesday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., as well as Friday and Saturday evenings in January during the holiday season. Tickets required; see alaskabg.org. The sculptures will be displayed until the weather melts them.

Nurseries: It is always interesting to see what they are doing at this time of year, so try to visit them. In addition, the seed rakes come out.

Sweet peas: You can start your own and pinch them to create bushy plants that will bloom earlier than the traditional start of April. As you wish. Our favorite sweet pea vendor is reneesgarden.com

]]>
On gardening: South African geophytes https://www.rogersgardengate.com/on-gardening-south-african-geophytes/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 14:35:39 +0000 https://www.rogersgardengate.com/on-gardening-south-african-geophytes/ Today’s column, following our recent round-up of South African succulents, features South African geophytes, another large category of plants from this botanical hotspot. As a reminder, geophytes are perennial plants with an underground food storage organ, for example a bulb, a tuber, a corm or a rhizome. Succulent plant scholars do not consider geophytes to […]]]>

Today’s column, following our recent round-up of South African succulents, features South African geophytes, another large category of plants from this botanical hotspot.

As a reminder, geophytes are perennial plants with an underground food storage organ, for example a bulb, a tuber, a corm or a rhizome. Succulent plant scholars do not consider geophytes to be succulents because succulents store moisture while geophytes store food.

An exceptional work, “The Color Encyclopedia of Cape Bulbs” (Timber Press, 2002) lists 83 genera of these plants, which include some 1,200 species, three quarters of which are endemic to South Africa.

This column presents a small sample of those plants that grow in my garden, as examples of the large and diverse South African geophytes.

We include two arbitrary groupings of these plants: my sense of more and less familiar varieties. You can group them differently.

As a guide, several of these plants include “Lily” in their common names but are actually not members of the Lily plant family (Liliaceae). Such misnames could be based on their resemblance to the familiar flower shape of true lilies.

Familiar South African geophytes

African lily (Agapanthus praecox ssp orientalis Getty White’). This South African plant is part of the Amaryllis plant family. Its common names include Lily of the Nile, although it is not native to the Nile region. The genus includes seven species, including the familiar A. africanus with purple-red flowers, and the less common A. praecox, which is shown here. Foliage grows from rhizomes up to 2 feet tall by 4 feet wide; the flower stalks rise in summer to 4 feet high. These plants are easy to grow in sun or shade and are often seen in private gardens and community spaces.

Montbretia (Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’). This plant is a widely grown plant among more than 400 hybrid cultivars. They grow from small bulbs and in summer produce clusters of fiery red flowers. Its small bulbs are easily separated, making them easy to propagate and potentially invasive, although they look attractive. They are part of the Iris plant family.

Fortnight Lily (Dietes iridioides). Another member of the Iris plant family, this plant grows from rhizomes to develop 2-4 foot tall clumps of narrow, sword-shaped, stiff evergreen leaves and numerous white flowers marked with yellow and purple. The flowers appear over a long season at two-week intervals (hence the common name), but last only one day.

Flowering herb (Freesia laxa var. alba). Known for its powerful sweet fragrance, this hybrid with creamy white flowers is very popular in the garden. Other cultivars are available in a range of colors, with mixed and single-colored varieties. They grow easily from bulbs, develop stems up to 18 inches tall, and in spring produce tubular flowers 2 inches long.

Red-hot Poker (Kniphofia ‘Pineapple Popsicle’). Although there are over 73 species in this genus, almost all plants grown in residential gardens are hybrids of two or more species. They grow from rhizomes and develop clumps of narrow, grass-like leaves ranging from 18-inch dwarfs to 6 feet. giants. They produce tall spikes of upright, brightly colored flowers in shades of red, orange or yellow, often bi-colored. Members of the Lily plant family, they have a long blooming season, beginning mostly in summer. They grow in full sun or partial shade, depending on the variety, but all require moderate humidity.

Calla (Zantedeschia aethiopica). Sometimes called “Calla Lily”, this plant is part of the Arum plant family (Araceae). They grow from rhizomes, can reach 3 feet tall, and need year-round moisture to produce their attractive white bracts (or spathes) that surround a spike (or spadix) of tiny true flowers. Hybrid cultivars are available in a wide range of spathe colors.

Lesser known South African geophytes

Blue Scepter (Aristea capitata). This plant, a member of the Iris plant family, grows from rhizomes to form linear leaves in 3-foot clumps. tall and broad, with taller stems of true blue flowers with yellow stamens. The most common variety, A. ecklonii ‘Blue Stars’, is very similar.

Snake Flower (Bulbine Frutescens). This plant has bulbous tubers (not really bulbs), from which grow a 2-ft. clumps of succulent leaves and, in the spring, 2 to 3 foot spikes of small yellow flowers. They are part of the Asphodelaceae plant family and are related to Haworthias and Aloes. They grow easily and can be propagated easily from stem cuttings. I acquired a handful of cuttings from a recent garden swap, and I need to plant them.

Bush lily (Clivia miniata). Yet another member of the Amaryllis family. They have been very popular plants in California since soon after they arrived in England from South Africa. The commonly grown C. miniata has orange-red or yellow flowers and (rarely) almost white flowers which are natural mutations. They have pretty dark green, strap-like leaves. Several hybrid cultivars have been produced through various combinations of the four species of the genus.

Natal lily (Crinum moorei). Another member of the Amaryllis plant family, the Natal Lily develops bulbs up to 8 inches in diameter, a flowering stem up to 4 feet tall, and clusters of five to 10 large, open, white to pale pink flowers. In the wild it grows in wet, swampy areas, but it thrives with minimal irrigation in my garden. A recent online interview with Jenks Farmer, author of “Crinum: Unearthing the History and Cultivation of the World’s Biggest Bulb,” described this plant as a garden favorite in the southeastern United States, but it also grows well in the Monterey Bay area. .

Blood lily/brush lily (Haemanthus coccineus). There are 22 species in this genus, a member of the Amaryllis plant family. H. coccineus, among the earliest identified species, has blood-red flowers, hence the common name; several other species have white flowers. The plant has brush-shaped flowers, which appear in late summer, followed by surprisingly attractive broad leaves.

Guernsey lily (Nerine sarniensis). Another member of the Amaryllis plant family, the Guernsey lily is a summer-dormant winter species that develops clusters of funnel-shaped flowers with recurving petals, in colors ranging from crimson to scarlet and pink pale to dark pink. There is also a nice pure white form. The plant has clusters of linear strap-like leaves that follow the flowers.

Advance your knowledge

The Wave Hill Public Garden & Cultural Center, located in the Bronx, New York, announced a new series of webinars, starting with “New Aesthetics for Public Spaces,” at 3 p.m. on January 19. The presenter will be garden designer and landscape architect Ching-Fang Chen, described as “passionate about deepening the connection between people and the environment”. In her presentation, she “will share how she merges cultural and ecological values ​​in design to deliver a more essential expression of beauty.” For more information and to register for this paid event, go to https://www.wavehill.org/calendar and scroll down to the webinar title.

Enrich your gardening days

Explore South Africa’s botanical riches, especially the succulents featured in a recent column and the geophytes sampled in today’s column. As noted earlier, some South African geophytes are widely grown in California gardens, but other less common varieties offer unusual attractive shapes and a welcome change of pace from the everyday offerings of garden nurseries. They are well adapted to the growing conditions of the Monterey Bay area, so they won’t require exceptional growing skills.

Enjoy your garden and include some exploration!

Tom Karwin is Past President of the Friends of the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum, the Monterey Bay Area Cactus & Succulent Society, and the Monterey Bay Iris Society, and UC Lifetime Master Gardener.

]]>
Tom Karwin, on gardening | South African geophytes – Santa Cruz Sentinel https://www.rogersgardengate.com/tom-karwin-on-gardening-south-african-geophytes-santa-cruz-sentinel/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 20:00:52 +0000 https://www.rogersgardengate.com/tom-karwin-on-gardening-south-african-geophytes-santa-cruz-sentinel/ Take care of your garden Today’s column, following our recent overview of South African succulents, features South African geophytes, another large category of plants in this botanical hotspot. As a reminder, geophytes are perennial plants with an underground food storage organ, for example a bulb, a tuber, a corm or a rhizome. Succulent plant scholars […]]]>

Take care of your garden

Today’s column, following our recent overview of South African succulents, features South African geophytes, another large category of plants in this botanical hotspot.

As a reminder, geophytes are perennial plants with an underground food storage organ, for example a bulb, a tuber, a corm or a rhizome. Succulent plant scholars do not consider geophytes to be succulents because succulents store moisture while geophytes store food.

An exceptional work, “The Color Encyclopedia of Cape Bulbs” (Timber Press, 2002) lists 83 genera of these plants, which include some 1,200 species, three quarters of which are endemic to South Africa.

This column presents a small sample of those plants that grow in my garden, as examples of the large and diverse South African geophytes.

We include two arbitrary groupings of these plants: my sense of more and less familiar varieties. You can group them differently.

As a guide, several of these plants include “Lily” in their common names but are actually not members of the Lily plant family (Liliaceae). Such misnames could be based on their resemblance to the familiar flower shape of true lilies.

Familiar South African geophytes

African lily (Agapanthus praecox ssp orientalis Getty White’). This South African plant is part of the Amaryllis plant family. Its common names include Lily of the Nile, although it is not native to the Nile region. The genus includes seven species, including the familiar A. africanus with purple-red flowers, and the less common A. praecox, which is shown here. Foliage grows from rhizomes up to 2 feet tall by 4 feet wide; the flower stalks rise in summer to 4 feet high. These plants are easy to grow in sun or shade and are often seen in private gardens and community spaces.

Montbretia (Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’). This plant is a widely grown plant among more than 400 hybrid cultivars. They grow from small bulbs and in summer produce clusters of fiery red flowers. Its small bulbs are easily separated, making them easy to propagate and potentially invasive, although they look attractive. They are part of the Iris plant family.

Fortnight Lily (Dietes iridioides). Another member of the Iris plant family, this plant grows from rhizomes to develop 2-4 foot tall clumps of narrow, sword-shaped, stiff evergreen leaves and numerous white flowers marked with yellow and purple. The flowers appear over a long season at two-week intervals (hence the common name), but last only one day.

Flowering herb (Freesia laxa var. alba). Known for its powerful sweet fragrance, this hybrid with creamy white flowers is very popular in the garden. Other cultivars are available in a range of colors, with mixed and single-colored varieties. They grow easily from bulbs, develop stems up to 18 inches tall, and in spring produce tubular flowers 2 inches long.

Red-hot Poker (Kniphofia ‘Pineapple Popsicle’). Although there are over 73 species in this genus, almost all plants grown in residential gardens are hybrids of two or more species. They grow from rhizomes and develop clumps of narrow, grass-like leaves ranging from 18-inch dwarfs to 6 feet. giants. They produce tall spikes of upright, brightly colored flowers in shades of red, orange or yellow, often bi-colored. Members of the Lily plant family, they have a long blooming season, beginning mostly in summer. They grow in full sun or partial shade, depending on the variety, but all require moderate humidity.

Calla (Zantedeschia aethiopica). Sometimes called “Calla Lily”, this plant is part of the Arum plant family (Araceae). They grow from rhizomes, can reach 3 feet tall, and need year-round moisture to produce their attractive white bracts (or spathes) that surround a spike (or spadix) of tiny true flowers. Hybrid cultivars are available in a wide range of spathe colors.

Lesser known South African geophytes

Blue Scepter (Aristea capitata). This plant, a member of the Iris plant family, grows from rhizomes to form linear leaves in 3-foot clumps. tall and broad, with taller stems of true blue flowers with yellow stamens. The most common variety, A. ecklonii ‘Blue Stars’, is very similar.

Snake Flower (Bulbine Frutescens). This plant has bulbous tubers (not really bulbs), from which grow a 2-ft. clumps of succulent leaves and, in the spring, 2 to 3 foot spikes of small yellow flowers. They are part of the Asphodelaceae plant family and are related to Haworthias and Aloes. They grow easily and can be propagated easily from stem cuttings. I acquired a handful of cuttings from a recent garden swap, and I need to plant them.

Bush lily (Clivia miniata). Yet another member of the Amaryllis family. They have been very popular plants in California since soon after they arrived in England from South Africa. The commonly grown C. miniata has orange-red or yellow flowers and (rarely) almost white flowers which are natural mutations. They have pretty dark green, strap-like leaves. Several hybrid cultivars have been produced through various combinations of the four species of the genus.

Natal lily (Crinum moorei). Another member of the Amaryllis plant family, the Natal Lily develops bulbs up to 8 inches in diameter, a flowering stem up to 4 feet tall, and clusters of five to 10 large, open, white to pale pink flowers. In the wild it grows in wet, swampy areas, but it thrives with minimal irrigation in my garden. A recent online interview with Jenks Farmer, author of “Crinum: Unearthing the History and Cultivation of the World’s Biggest Bulb,” described this plant as a garden favorite in the southeastern United States, but it also grows well in the Monterey Bay area. .

Blood lily/brush lily (Haemanthus coccineus). There are 22 species in this genus, a member of the Amaryllis plant family. H. coccineus, among the earliest identified species, has blood-red flowers, hence the common name; several other species have white flowers. The plant has brush-shaped flowers, which appear in late summer, followed by surprisingly attractive broad leaves.

Guernsey lily (Nerine sarniensis). Another member of the Amaryllis plant family, the Guernsey lily is a summer-dormant winter species that develops clusters of funnel-shaped flowers with recurving petals, in colors ranging from crimson to scarlet and pink pale to dark pink. There is also a nice pure white form. The plant has clusters of linear strap-like leaves that follow the flowers.

Advance your knowledge

The Wave Hill Public Garden & Cultural Center, located in the Bronx, New York, announced a new series of webinars, beginning with “New Aesthetics for Public Spaces,” at 3:00 p.m. PST on January 19. The presenter will be garden designer and landscape architect Ching-Fang Chen, described as “passionate about deepening the connection between people and the environment”. In her presentation, she “will share how she merges cultural and ecological values ​​in design to deliver a more essential expression of beauty.” For more information and to register for this paid event, go to https://www.wavehill.org/calendar and scroll down to the webinar title.

Enrich your gardening days

Explore South Africa’s botanical riches, especially the succulents featured in a recent column and the geophytes sampled in today’s column. As noted earlier, some South African geophytes are widely grown in California gardens, but other less common varieties offer unusual attractive shapes and a welcome change of pace from the everyday offerings of garden nurseries. They are well adapted to the growing conditions of the Monterey Bay area, so they won’t require exceptional growing skills.

Enjoy your garden and include some exploration!

Tom Karwin is past president of the Friends of the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum, the Monterey Bay Area Cactus & Succulent Society, and the Monterey Bay Iris Society, and UC Lifetime Master Gardener (certified 1999-2009 ). He is now a board member and garden coach for the Santa Cruz Hostel Society. To see daily photos of her garden, https://www.facebook.com/ongardingcom-566511763375123/. For information on gardening coaching and an archive of previous On Gardening columns, visit http://ongarding.com. Contact him with comments or questions at tom@karwin.com.

]]>
Gardening column: yellow flowering mahonias glow in winter | Chroniclers https://www.rogersgardengate.com/gardening-column-yellow-flowering-mahonias-glow-in-winter-chroniclers/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://www.rogersgardengate.com/gardening-column-yellow-flowering-mahonias-glow-in-winter-chroniclers/ [ad_1] October through January is the flowering season for three mahonias that do well in the Lowcountry of South Carolina and throughout the Southeastern United States. Based on my experience, I recommend the three shade loving evergreen shrubs with “daffodil colored flower spikes” as described by Elizabeth Lawrence (“A Southern Garden”, UNC Press, 1991, p […]]]>


[ad_1]

October through January is the flowering season for three mahonias that do well in the Lowcountry of South Carolina and throughout the Southeastern United States. Based on my experience, I recommend the three shade loving evergreen shrubs with “daffodil colored flower spikes” as described by Elizabeth Lawrence (“A Southern Garden”, UNC Press, 1991, p . 7).

Leather-leaved mahonia (Berberis bealei, Previously Mahonia bealei) is the most famous Mahonia in the South East. Other common names are eastern holly and Beale’s barberry, the English translation of the new Latin botanical name. Gardeners who have barberry will recognize the similarities between the flower shapes of the two plants.

The architecture of the leather-leaved mahonia is striking enough to be the focal point of a landscape. Steve Bender, editor of “The New Southern Living Gardening Book” (Oxmoor House, 2015, p. 427) writes that it has a “strong pattern of vertical stems, horizontal foliage” and is a “distinguished plant against stone, brick, wood, glass. ” This recommendation led me to place my two plants in front of the brick facade of my house.

Lawrence, Charlotte’s outspoken garden columnist, had a different opinion. Despite her praise of winter flowers, she warned, “In poor soil, it is long and unattractive.” If a leather-leaved mahonia gets too much afternoon sun, like one of my plants does, it will also become tinny as it sheds its lower leaves prematurely.

Gardening column: history and traditions of mistletoe

Leather-leaved Mahonia can grow to 10 feet tall, but my plants seem to grow to 5 feet before they get long. Flower spikes are 3-4 inches long with up to 50 yellow flowers per spike. They bloom from late December to mid-February.






Mahonia Soft Caress Flowers

Mahonia Soft Caress does not have sharp tips on its leaves, hence its common name. The long leaves and narrow leaflets are described as ferns or bamboos. Anthony Keinath / Supplied




Leather-leaved Mahonia is on invasive plant lists in several southeastern states, but not in South Carolina. Mockingbirds love the fleshy blue berries and spread the seed in wild areas.

Sweet caress (Mahonia eurybracteata) is a popular small mahonia from the Southern Living Plant Collection. It is well suited to living in the ground or in large pots, with an adult size of 3 feet tall by 3 ½ feet wide.

This mahonia does not have sharp tips on its leaves, like the leather-leaved mahonia, hence the common name Soft Caress. The long leaves with narrow leaflets are described as ferns or bamboos.

Receive a weekly recap of South Carolina’s opinions and analysis from The Post and Courier delivered to your inbox Monday night.

Of the three mahonias mentioned in this article, Soft Caress flowers first, from October 8 (in 2013 and 2021) until November 11 (in 2018). The flower spikes resemble those of the leather-leaved mahonia.

Soft Caress is damaged by snow and prolonged cold temperatures. In January 2018, my plants froze almost to the ground but quickly grew back. A young cottontail rabbit, who apparently couldn’t find enough to eat that spring, regularly ate the new growth until I surrounded the plants with wire mesh.

Gardening column: 2021, a year of the first gardening

One of the more recent mahonias is Marvel, a hybrid cultivar (Mahonia × media) introduced by Southern Living. The Leather-leaved Mahonia is one of its parents. Marvel’s notable characteristics, compared to the Leather-leaved Mahonia, are vertical growth with a main stem, larger, more showy flowers, and less pungent leaves.






Mahonia Marvel Flowers

One of the newer mahonias is Marvel, a hybrid cultivar introduced by Southern Living. The Leather-leaved Mahonia is one of its parents. Compared to the leather-leaved mahonia, Marvel has larger, more showy flowers and less pungent leaves. Anthony Keinath / Supplied




According to Southern Living Plants, Marvel is 6 feet tall by 4 feet wide. My plant, which has been in place for three years, will probably reach this height but may be narrower. It grew 8 inches in 2021. The plant has a lateral stem with a cluster of flowers as tall as on the main stem.

Flower spikes on Marvel are 8-10 inches long with around 70 flowers per spike. This year, the flowers began to open on December 10. The leaves are up to 15 inches long with 10 pairs of leaflets plus a terminal leaflet.

All three mahonias need moist soil with a good dose of compost to thrive.

Leatherleaf and Soft Caress mahonias may require pruning if the stems become long. The general rule of thumb to correct leg growth on shrubs is to prune one-third of the stems each spring. The stems should be cut to a lateral growth point or, if there is none, to the ground. This gradual trimming gives the plant a somewhat natural look, instead of being heavily sheared, and preserves productive leaves on the remaining stems as the plant produces new stems.

Soft Caress and Marvel are good substitutes for Leather Leaf Mahonia in South Carolina.

Anthony keinath is professor of plant pathology at the Clemson Coastal Research & Education Center in Charleston. His expertise is in vegetable diseases. He is also an avid gardener. Contact him at tknth@clemson.edu.

[ad_2]

]]>
In the garden: gardening with La Niña https://www.rogersgardengate.com/in-the-garden-gardening-with-la-nina/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 22:00:34 +0000 https://www.rogersgardengate.com/in-the-garden-gardening-with-la-nina/ [ad_1] It will be a long and wet summer due to the arrival of La Niña. For gardeners, that means an adjustment in the way you’ve planned, planted, and maintained your slice of paradise. We were under its spell last summer, so this shouldn’t be new, unless you’re new to your gardening journey. The good […]]]>


[ad_1]

It will be a long and wet summer due to the arrival of La Niña.

For gardeners, that means an adjustment in the way you’ve planned, planted, and maintained your slice of paradise.

We were under its spell last summer, so this shouldn’t be new, unless you’re new to your gardening journey.

The good news is that the Bureau of Meteorology science group informs us that this time around, La Niña is going to have a milder effect on us.

A natural weather phenomenon, La Niña occurs when there is a change in weather conditions and ocean temperatures in the Pacific Ocean around the equator.

The waters are cooling and the clouds, with their rain, are heading towards us in Australia.

While this event usually only happens once in a while, it can happen for several years in a row like this summer.

In general, La Niña brings more rain, cooler average daytime temperatures, and warmer nights, so let’s explore what a difference this will make for your garden and what can you do about it.

La Niña action plan

All that humidity at a warmer time of year is an open invitation to the dreaded mold.

If you’re planting now, build mounds to make each new plant appear in raised beds, whether they are containers or completely mounded areas.

This helps in soil drainage and can help increase air flow in some situations.

Speaking of airflow, now is not the time to plant too closely, in fact give all of your new botanical friends some space in between to help keep the air flowing around. them.

The mulch will hold water for any heat waves that might arise, but now more than ever you need to make sure the mulch is away from the trunks and stems, at least a good span or more depending on the size of your plant. .

You will need to go out into your garden every day as the water will start to pool, which will also cause the plants to grow faster.

You need to watch things more closely.

Cut and prune the leaves and lower branches of the plants and remove some of the side branches to open up this breathing space for your plants as well.

Empty containers filled with water, remove dead and dying foliage, fruits and flowers, and inspect for signs of disease, especially fungal problems.

Spray zucchini, melons, pumpkins, squash and cucumbers weekly if powdery mildew appears with a mixture of half milk and half water or 2 cups of water with ½ teaspoon of baking soda mixed.

Never use in full sun, make sure all areas of the plant are covered and repeat after it rains.

While grouping potted plants together can be a positive step in creating a microenvironment with higher humidity, you may find that they too will do better now with a little space between them.

The extra water will also cause nutrients in garden soil or outdoor potted plants to dilute and run off, requiring additional feeding.

Slow release granular fertilizers are a good solution at this time as they will give you a longer period of effectiveness compared to liquid or even solid formulations.

Make sure your compost pile is not too wet.

You can cover and you can also fix compost that has gotten too wet but by turning and adding extra dry ingredients such as cardboard, straws, sawdust, and chipped garden pruning.

With all the water, La Niña causes an increase in cloud cover. When planting, therefore, adjust your plans to get the maximum amount of sunshine for the plants that need them.

Move potted plants to areas that will receive more sun if needed, don’t go by what is usual with them.

With the decrease in sun and heat due to cloud cover, you might notice a decrease in products, but don’t worry, it’s just nature and next year things should be back to normal. normal for you.

One upside is that you may be able to plant a bit outside of the “normal” season this year with an early fall planting, but just like our daily weather forecast things can change.

Watch your own area, note the temperature each day to determine trends, but ultimately we all know that a few hot, harsh summer days can ruin the best intentions.

My advice is to plant indoors (greenhouses and stands) so that you can easily move them to more user-friendly areas if necessary.

One final note, these conditions bring out a lot of creepy critters.

Funnel webs and snakes to name just two.

Always wear gloves and closed shoes, and shake gardening boots and shoes before putting them on.

Gardening Book Review: The Good Life, How To Grow a Better World by Hannah Moloney

Affirm, 2021 ISBN: 9781922419385

I’m going straight to a branch here and to be honest.

I saw this book and hesitated.

Yes, I heard the hype, but it seemed a bit on the hip, and I need a big dose of substance as well as inspiration in my gardening books.

Then a friend had a copy when he visited me last week and yes I have now ordered mine.

Hannah shares her life, the good life, with contagious joy and in a way that will inspire you to look at what you already have around you and make the most of it.

This energy is that of practical positivity with an emphasis on actions that will ensure a better world for all of us.

A much needed example of the simple steps we can all take towards independence, self-care and community involvement.

Sprinkled with recipes (yogurts, breads, garden aids), tips, examples, tutorials (DIY water tanks!) Sustainable gardening books for the rest of us.

Also, you make me wanna have pink hair Hannah again.

This book would make another great Christmas present.

GARDENING GUIDE FOR COASTAL GARDENERS THIS WEEK

It’s time to plant some blooming potted roses and get that potted color for Christmas.

A few of the things you might be planting this week include just about any culinary herb, Asian greens, asparagus, artichokes, beans, red beets, broccoli, cabbage, Cape gooseberry, bell pepper, carrot, celeriac, celery, chicory, chili, choko, cucumber, eggplant, fennel, ginger, horseradish, kale, kohlrabi, leek, lettuce, squash, mustard greens, okra, parsnip, potato, pumpkin, radish, arugula, salsify, silver beet, spring onion, sweet corn, squash, sweet potato, taro, tomato, turnip, green warrigal, sunflower, aster, bedding begonia, calendula, poppy california, carnation, celosia, chrysanthemum, coleus, cosmos, dahlia, dianthus, everlasting daisy, gaillardia, gazania, gerbera, honesty, inpatients, kangaroo paw, marigold, nasturtium, phlox, portulaca, salvia, snapdragon, waratah, zinnia .

You and Your Garden: Toukley Leeches

Q. Dear Cheralyn,

We have been living in Toukley for four years now and have noticed leeches in our garden.

It’s new because we haven’t noticed them before.

Why is this happening and what can we do about it?

Diane, Toukley

A. Hello Dianne, although they are a natural part of our environment, they are not pleasant to find in your garden, I agree.

Not all leeches are bloodsuckers, some find plants to be a much tastier alternative.

Some are aquatic and some are dwellers of the land, but I can see that you have an abundance of bloodsuckers that need to be shown on the doorstep, so here are some tips you could try.

While this may not be good for all of your plants (do a patch test), spraying lemon juice or a dilute solution of lemon juice and water has been found to be helpful in keeping them at bay.

Sprinkling salt in an area they are crossing will also help, but like lemon juice, it can negatively affect the plants in your garden.

Simple preventative measures include ensuring better drainage in your garden and not allowing water to pool in plant pots and containers.

Empty and clean bodies of water regularly and if they aren’t home to aquatic life, a drop of white vinegar can help deter them.

I love this old method of drawing them.

Get the liver as fresh as possible from the local butcher.

Place it on a plate in the affected area, once it is full of leeches, place it in an airtight container and throw it away.

Bouquets of love,

Cheralyn

Next week: Merry Christmas with trees, bushes and flowers

Cheralyn Darcey is a gardening author, community garden coordinator and, along with Pete Little, “At Home with The Gardening Gang” host from 8am to 10am live every Saturday on CoastFM963.

She is also the co-host of @MostlyAboutPlants, a weekly podcast on botanical history and gardening with Vicki White.

Send your gardening questions, events and news to: gardeningcentralcoast@gmail.com

[ad_2]

]]>
Master Gardener: Landscaping with Nature in Mind | Lifestyles https://www.rogersgardengate.com/master-gardener-landscaping-with-nature-in-mind-lifestyles/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://www.rogersgardengate.com/master-gardener-landscaping-with-nature-in-mind-lifestyles/ [ad_1] Landscaping with nature in mind The garden has been put to bed and is ready for a blanket of snow. The last garden ornaments are in storage, the containers have been emptied, the fall bulbs are planted, and the trees that have not found a home are healed. Fences to prevent hungry creatures from […]]]>


[ad_1]

Landscaping with nature in mind

The garden has been put to bed and is ready for a blanket of snow. The last garden ornaments are in storage, the containers have been emptied, the fall bulbs are planted, and the trees that have not found a home are healed. Fences to prevent hungry creatures from munching on new trees have been erected. The gardener and the garden are ready for a rest. Ladybugs, bumblebees, fireflies and butterflies are also at rest, finding refuge in leaves, old stems, stone piles, rotten logs and underground spaces. Wintering birds have been busy in the garden eating seeds left standing for them, looking for tasty insects in the nooks and crannies of tree bark, and occasionally visiting filled feeders and a source of heated water.

I love my garden and love it even more when it is occupied by the chirping of birds, the buzzing of bees, flashing fireflies and butterflies gliding from flower to flower. It has been a work in progress for over 25 years. I started years ago trying to make my garden more attractive to birds because bird watching is another of my interests. This prompted me to add flowering plants, herbs, and native trees to help attract birds to the yard. I told visitors that the backyard is habitat, not garden, because people expect your yard to be free of weeds, no signs of bugs and mulch. Wildflowers may not have been what they were looking for. Everyone wanted ooh and ahh your hostas, daylilies, and plants with distant origins.

And what about your lawn? Do you let your dandelions bloom? You do not eliminate all the weeds that dare to grow? How is it that it is not perfectly mowed and short? I call it lawn syndrome. Americans have a love affair with the perfectly manicured lawn. No room for birds or bees there. Considering that residential construction sites make up 25-60% of total green space in American cities, maybe we need to change our tone a bit. A 2014 study showed that homeowners who mowed their lawns once every 2 weeks (vs. once a week) had a 60% increase in bee species. Those who mowed once every 3 weeks had a 300% increase in bee species. Not mowing allows these little “weeds” to flower. Some of these flowers are particularly useful to bees that emerge in early spring when sources of nectar and pollen are limited.

The State of Minnesota has launched a Lawns to Legumes program. They encourage the establishment of native pollinator-friendly plantings in residential lawns. They are even willing to pay homeowners to help share the cost of establishing pollinator habitat in their gardens. Why? Perhaps this is because the state bee of Minnesota, the Rusty Patched Bumblebee, has been listed as an endangered species. Over the past 20 years, its population has declined by 87%, and it is still probably only found in 0.1% of its historic range (which includes New York).

Why should you care that a bumblebee is in decline? Unfortunately, there is not just one. Many insect populations, including bees, butterflies, fireflies, and other beneficial insects, are in decline around the world. Two common reasons are habitat loss and the use of pesticides. Since most people think that all insects are pests or a nuisance, this doesn’t seem like a reason to be alarmed, but insects play a bigger role in ecosystems. They pollinate plants, not just our food plants, but the native plants that provide food for many wild animals and birds. They are also food for many birds, reptiles, bats and other animals. Many insects are decomposers or even predators of actual pest insects. We need bugs.

Fortunately, most insects don’t need acres upon acres to thrive. Many native bees never travel more than a few hundred feet from their nests. Making changes to an area the size of your yard, or part of your garden, can have a huge impact on local insect populations. A place to start is to include native plants in your garden. Native plants support native insects as they evolve together. Many of the ornamental plants that have become standard in landscape plantings do not support our native insects as there is no history between them. Some of these ornamental plants have also become invasive and have invaded what remains of our “wild” areas.

Just like our garden plants, not all native plants grow just anywhere. It always comes down to ‘the right plant in the right place’. There are native plants for dry, sandy, and sunny conditions, just as there are native plants for shade or wet, soggy places. Spend the winter researching the native plants that would be at home in your backyard. If you have room, add a native tree to your garden. Trees give you value for your money. They can put up with a lot of caterpillars (baby bird food) and you will hardly notice if the leaves are chewed. If space is at a premium, focus on native plants that bloom in the fall. This is an important time of year, especially for bumblebee queens as they prepare to hibernate, and it is an important time of year for migrating monarch butterflies. Both need abundant flowers to provide much-needed nectar reserves.

Unfortunately, many will see your new habit as “messy” because it doesn’t match their view of what a garden or lawn should be like. You will likely need to educate your friends, family, and neighbors. Try hanging a pollinator habitat sign in your front yard to let everyone know that your garden is a haven for bees, butterflies, and beneficial insects to feed, nest, and overwinter. Before making a big conversion, check your local ordinances. In some areas there are height restrictions to be observed and even restrictions against what you can plant in your front yard. Hopefully the aesthetic tastes of the past will catch up with the fact that we need pollinators and other insects. Make 2022 the year you started sharing your landscape with the little things that make the world go round.

Resources for this article include: Lawns to Legumes, Homegrown National Park, and OSU Pollinators in the City series (Policy Dimensions of Insect Pollinator Conservation).

The Orléans County CCE will be offering Master Gardener training in 2022 to anyone interested in becoming a MG volunteer. It will be a new hybrid training, a combination of online and in-person courses. The training will start on January 13 and end on April 7. The registration deadline is December 22. The cost of the training is $ 200, but there is a 50% discount for the first 10 people to register. If Internet accessibility is an issue, participants can use the office hours of the Orléans County CCE Education Center. For more information or to register, contact Katie Oakes at (585) 798-4265 ext. 125 or email klo54@cornell.edu.

[ad_2]

]]>
Tom Karwin, on gardening | Thank you for the plants of the Mediterranean – Santa Cruz Sentinel https://www.rogersgardengate.com/tom-karwin-on-gardening-thank-you-for-the-plants-of-the-mediterranean-santa-cruz-sentinel/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 20:04:52 +0000 https://www.rogersgardengate.com/tom-karwin-on-gardening-thank-you-for-the-plants-of-the-mediterranean-santa-cruz-sentinel/ [ad_1] Take care of your garden This week’s episode for the current planting season focuses on the Mediterranean region, which includes 17 European, African and Asian countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, as well as the Madeira archipelago and the Canary Islands, nearby in the ‘Atlantic Ocean. Gardeners in the Monterey Bay area favor plants that […]]]>


[ad_1]

Take care of your garden

This week’s episode for the current planting season focuses on the Mediterranean region, which includes 17 European, African and Asian countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, as well as the Madeira archipelago and the Canary Islands, nearby in the ‘Atlantic Ocean.

Gardeners in the Monterey Bay area favor plants that originate from a Mediterranean climate, characterized by mild to cool and rainy winters and hot to hot, dry summers. This climate is named after the Mediterranean region, but this label can be troublesome as a similar climate occurs on the California coast, the southern coast of South Africa, the west coast of central Chile, and the southwestern regions. from Australia.

A better and more meaningful label for this climate is “dry summer”.

Each of these dry regions in summer has distinct native plants, so thematic gardening might devote an area of ​​the landscape to plants from one of these regions. This plan invites to showcase the plants of a chosen region and to benefit from their common cultural requirements. UC Santa Cruz Arboretum and Botanical Garden (arboretum.ucsc.edu/) and UC Berkeley Botanical Garden (botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu/) are examples of this approach in public gardens.

Public botanical gardens often organize their outdoor spaces according to geographic areas such as dry summer areas. Some botanical gardens have an Asian garden setting and interest, which combines distinctive plants with a distinctive landscaping style. The Huntington Botanic Gardens (www.huntington.org/gardens) include both Japanese and Chinese Gardens.

The total area of ​​the Mediterranean region has not been specified in the literature I have seen, possibly because it does not correspond to well documented political boundaries. The many areas of dry climate in summer make up a small portion (perhaps 5%) of the world’s total arable land, that is, land suitable for cultivation. This makes them special for gardeners.

The dry summer climate in the Mediterranean region shows considerable variation, taking into account differences in altitude and other factors. In addition, some horticulturalists have described three subtypes of this climate: cool, hot and hot summers.

Given this variation, a Mediterranean region of a garden, whether a small or large space, is unlikely to have companion plants, i.e. those that grow together in nature. If it would be possible to develop such a garden, it suffices to group together the plants native to the region to illustrate the category and respect their common cultural needs.

The most emblematic plants of the Mediterranean region are lavender (Lavendula), figs (Ficus carica) and olives (Olea europaea). There are many other lesser-known genera that originated in this botanically rich region.

The following plants, randomly selected from my garden, are a small sample of the horticultural diversity of the Mediterranean region. With any luck, they will suggest to gardeners of the character and interest of the region to include a selection of plants from the region in their own gardens.

European gray sedge (Carex divulsa). This evergreen, clumping herbaceous plant likes partial shade, tolerates swampy soils, and, once established, is fairly drought tolerant. It grows up to 2×2 feet or more, spreads slowly, and makes an attractive addition to many other plants. It was mistaken for a native of California and marketed as the Berkeley Sedge, but it is a broadly distributed European species.

Rose Rose (species of Cistus). This plant is native to Spain and Portugal, hybridizes naturally, has been loved by gardeners since 1860, and is available in 19 species and many cultivars. Popular varieties include Silver Pink Rock Rose (C. argenteus ‘Silver Pink’), White Rock Rose (C. ladanifer ‘Blanche’), and Crimson-Spot Rock Rose (C. ladanifer maculatus). They are short-lived plants that produce flowers in June and July, seeds profusely, and are easily propagated from cuttings. Pinching after flowering helps maintain a bushy shape.

Corsican hellebore (Helleborus argutifolius). It is a hardy plant with cup-shaped pale green flowers from late winter to early spring and attractive leathery foliage. It grows to 4 feet tall and 3 feet wide, which is taller than most hellebores, which are typically only 18 inches tall. After being cut hard after flowering, it produces attractive new growth in the fall. This species is known to seed many new plants each season.

Madeira Island Geranium (Geranium maderense). This largest of the geranium species is a 3ft x 3ft bi-year plant that displays attractive foliage between flowering years. When it blooms, it displays an amazing mass of dark mauve-pink flowers with a dark center, reaching five feet. There is also a white flowered form (G. m. ‘Alba’).

Large Bearded Iris (Iris’ That’s all people). The Iris family includes several versions of bearded iris (grouped by height), variations of Iris germanica, a natural hybrid of I. pallida and I. variegata. This plant was first identified in 1753 and has been hybridized into over 60,000 cultivars with an extraordinary range of colors, color combinations and flower shapes. Iris lovers are challenged to keep up with the latest presentations. One of my favorites is “That’s All Folks,” which was hybridized in Santa Cruz and won numerous awards including the top ranked Dykes Medal.

Variegated Lavender (Lavandula x allardii ‘Meerlo’). As already noted, lavender has long been associated with the Mediterranean region and valued for its appearance, fragrance, and moth deterrent. Several popular species include English lavender (L. angustifolia, which is actually native to Spain, France, Italy, Croatia), French lavender (L. dentata), and Spanish lavender (L. stoechas). My garden has several English lavender plants, but I particularly like L. x allardii ‘Meerlo’, which is a selection of the hybrid L dentata x L. latifoila.

Giant white scilla (Urginea maritima / Drimia maritima). This plant is quite efficient. It produces 18-inch wide leaves from November through summer. The leaves then disappear, and from summer to fall, the plant generates a four-foot flower stalk with an inflorescence of a large number (who counts?) Of white star-shaped flowers that attract birds and the bees. During this process, the large bulb (up to 12 ft wide) divides dichotomously, growing to two bulbs and eventually forming a large clump.

Improve your gardening knowledge

Upcoming webinars:

The Cactus & Succulent Society of America will present the “Yuccas” webinar at 10 am Saturday. Yuccas are typically large, evergreen plants native to hot, dry regions of Mexico and the Caribbean. They are popular for dramatic landscape elements and large displays of white or whitish flowers. Brian Kemble, curator at Ruth Bancroft Garden in Walnut Creek, and prolific author and speaker on succulents, will share his knowledge of the yuccas growing in their habitat. To register for this free event, visit cactusandsucculentsociety.org/.

The Garden Conservancy presents the “Beyond Wild: Gardens and Landscapes” webinar at 11:00 am On December 2, garden designer Raymond Jungles will describe his most significant design projects, which are also featured in his new book of the same title. To register, visit www.gardenconservancy.org/, click on Virtual Programs and then click on “Fall 2021 Literary Series”. For upcoming Garden Conservancy webinars, click on “Winter / Spring 2021 Virtual Programs”.

The UC Berkeley Botanical Garden has announced its December webinar schedule. Early offers include “Virtual December Butterfly Walk – Beyond the Bay Area” (11 am, December 5) and “Winter Conifers Virtual Tour” (3 pm, December 7). For more information on these free events and other virtual programs, visit Botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu/, click on “Programs” then “Programs and Workshops”.

Enrich your gardening days

Consider developing your own collection of plants from the Mediterranean basin. There are both familiar and pleasantly different plants to spruce up your garden.

Enjoy your garden!

Tom Karwin is the past president of the Friends of the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum, the Monterey Bay Area Cactus & Succulent Society, and the Monterey Bay Iris Society, and UC Lifetime Master Gardener (certified 1999- 2009). He is now a board member and garden coach for the Santa Cruz Hostel Society. To view photos of his garden daily, https://www.facebook.com/ongardeningcom-566511763375123/. To find an archive of previous gardening columns, visit http://ongardening.com. Contact him with comments or questions at tom@karwin.com.

[ad_2]

]]>
workshop shows how landscaping can help improve the region’s water quality | News https://www.rogersgardengate.com/workshop-shows-how-landscaping-can-help-improve-the-regions-water-quality-news/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://www.rogersgardengate.com/workshop-shows-how-landscaping-can-help-improve-the-regions-water-quality-news/ [ad_1] The City of Tahlequah and the Grand River Dam Authority hosted a workshop this week, demonstrating how landscaping can protect water quality. City stormwater manager Mohamed Bassime said the event was his first outreach since taking up his new post. On Tuesday, November 16, Jeri Fleming, of GRDA’s Ecosystems and Watershed Management Department, explained […]]]>


[ad_1]

The City of Tahlequah and the Grand River Dam Authority hosted a workshop this week, demonstrating how landscaping can protect water quality.

City stormwater manager Mohamed Bassime said the event was his first outreach since taking up his new post.

On Tuesday, November 16, Jeri Fleming, of GRDA’s Ecosystems and Watershed Management Department, explained to residents how runoff from Tahlequah Creek drains into the Illinois River and flows into the Gulf of Mexico.

“Everything we do in the watershed part is going to affect that, and we have to think about the fact that we all live in a watershed, and what we can do can make a difference,” Fleming said.

The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality lists degraded waters – those that do not meet the intended beneficial use. Fleming explained that a “beneficial use” could be defined as drinking water, use for irrigation, recreational use, and agricultural use.

“If our waterways do not meet these beneficial uses, they are altered for some reason, and we have over 11,000 miles of waterways in the state of Oklahoma that have been altered from one way or another, “she said.

Sixty-nine percent of those miles of stream were altered by an excess of pathogens or bacteria, and 22 percent were due to turbidity. Twenty-two percent occurred due to low dissolved oxygen content and 18 percent total dissolved solids.

“The sources of these particular types of pollutants are things that we can try to do something about, because they are the result of stormwater runoff,” Fleming said.

Careful landscaping can help improve water quality, and Fleming said there are several practices that can help ensure it.

“If you put in too much fertilizer, chemicals, or pesticides that weren’t absorbed, everything will go away. What happens to these nutrients when they enter the waterway is that they do exactly what they do on land, ”she said.

These nutrients cause plants to grow on land that will produce algae in the water.

“Our mowing practices can have an impact, so when we mow our grass that is too short, we don’t give the roots time to grow deeper. It takes about three to five days for the roots to start growing again, ”Fleming said.

The more the grass grows, the deeper the roots sink. Roots are a conduit for water and these help hold a yard in place.

“If you only have a very shallow root system and not a lot of grass, and you get a heavy rain, you’re going to have erosion in your yard,” Fleming said.

Another practice is to mulch a yard instead of bagging fallen leaves.

“When I leave this grass on my lawn, it will add nutrients to your soil and it will add organic content to your soil. It can actually help your garden get more moisture, which means you have to water less, ”Fleming said.

Mulching grass and leaves will also keep them from clogging storm drains.

“When you start adding too much and too much, it overwhelms the system and takes a lot of oxygen. That’s when you start having dissolved oxygen issues in the fall, ”she said.

Rain gardens can treat runoff by filtering the water before it flows into a stream. There are two rain gardens in Tahlequah, in the McDonald’s and Walmart parking lots.

“They capture this runoff and the plants and soil will filter these pollutants out of the water before it returns the stream,” Fleming said.

Another good practice for retaining water in place is the use of rain barrels. These barrels capture water from a roof and can hold it for later use on lawns, gardens and houseplants.

Participants received free rain barrels from GRDA and learned how to set up and use them.

[ad_2]

]]>